TEHRAN (Press Shia) – An American university professor and author said the so-called Republican-led “maximum pressure” campaign against Iran has “proven largely ineffective”.

– Politics news –

“The Republicans, as demonstrated via their ‘maximum pressure’ campaign, prefer to wield the elements of ‘hard power’, namely military and economic coercion. The latter approach has proven largely ineffective. In anything, the maximum pressure campaign has only succeeded in bringing the two countries closer to war,” Paul Poast, associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago, told Press Shia in an interview.

Poast is the author of The Economics of War and co-author of Organizing Democracy.

Following is the text of the interview:

Press Shia: What approach do you think Iran should take towards the new US government after Donald Trump failed to fulfill Washington’s demand to target the country’s economy as a result of the Islamic Republic’s resistance?

Poast: There are fundamental differences between the Democrats and the Republicans regarding the best way to approach Iran. Both share the goal of preventing Iran from developing a nuclear bomb. The question is how. The Democrats, as demonstrated with the JCPOA, prefer diplomacy.  The Republicans, as demonstrated via their “maximum pressure” campaign, prefer to wield the elements of “hard power”, namely military and economic coercion. The latter approach has proven largely ineffective. In anything, the “maximum pressure” campaign has only succeeded in bringing the two countries closer to war.

Press Shia: It seems that certain regional regimes including Saudi Arabia and Israel are opposed to any form of rapprochement between Iran and the US. They have reportedly pressured Joe Biden not to rejoin the JCPOA. Why? What are your thoughts on this?

Poast: The other factor to consider is the role of the US’ “special relationships” in the region, namely Israel and Saudi Arabia. Both are rivals of Iran and both do not wish to see a rapprochement between the US and Iran. Could it still happen? I think so, at least I could see the Biden administration eager to change course (given the inadequacies of the “maximum pressure” approach). Will Iran agree to talks?  Sanctions relief is one reason, but Iran might also be wary of yet another potential change in US policy 4 years from now (if a Republican re-enters office).  In short, talks might restart relatively quickly, but an agreement could be a long way away.